As politicians grandstand, employers cope with workplace religion

The spotlight is on religion in the workplace again, from the Kentucky county clerk who doesn’t want to issue same-sex marriage licenses to the Muslim flight attendant who doesn’t want to serve ExpressJet passengers alcohol.

Behind the scenes, though, employers find themselves trying to stay on the right side of the law. JoAn Hobbs, the executive director of an assisted living center in Alpharetta, told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution it’s not always easy to navigate law that leaves lots to the imagination about how to deal with employees’ religious freedoms on the job.

And in assisted living center where very elderly residents face matters of life and death, faith is often near the surface.

Find out more about how that plays out for Hobbs in Matt Kempner’s latest Unofficial Business column on myAJC.com.

JoAn Hobbs, executive director of Ivy Hall Assisted Living in Alpharetta, says it's not always easy to figure out how to accommodate employees' religious practices in the workplace. MATT KEMPNER / AJC

JoAn Hobbs, executive director of Ivy Hall Assisted Living in Alpharetta, says it’s not always easy to figure out how to accommodate employees’ religious practices in the workplace. MATT KEMPNER / AJC

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